Interfaith Health Care Association of Manitoba

Welcome to IHCAM 

The Interfaith Health Care Association of Manitoba (IHCAM) is a voluntary non-profit provincial association created in 1995 and comprised of health and social care organizations that are owned and operated by nine faith groups; Baptist, Catholic, Jewish, Lutheran, Mennonite , Pentecostal, Salvation Army, Seventh-Day Adventist and United. IHCAM advocates on behalf of its membership the value of faith-based health care and governance.

IHCAM’smember organizations represent over 13% of Manitoba’s health care budget employing over 10,000 staff and attracting over 2000 community volunteers.

Members

Recent News

SPRITUAL HEALTH CARE WEEK
October 21, 2019

Why do we celebrate Spiritual Care Workers?


Spiritual and Religious Care Providers are among the least well recognized caregivers in our communities. This is a week in which we
reflect on the importance of those who provide Care of the Soul to people in distress and offer an opportunity to recognize the value of spiritual and religious care and to honour those who provide the care.


What do they do?

  • When you are scared, lonely, confused, angry or disillusioned, Spiritual and Religious Care Providers will listen, clarify & share your pain.
  • A Spiritual & Religious Care Provider, or Chaplain, is a guide who offers spiritual direction in times of crisis, questions & wonderment.
  • Your Spiritual & Religious Care Provider or Chaplain offers counselling and support, and when asked, will contact representatives from your own faith group to assist in your care and comfort.
  • Your Spiritual & Religious Care Provider serves those of any faith, and those of no particular faith.

For more information, visit:  https://www.spiritualcareweek.org

Extra faith coverage thanks to local groups in provincial and federal election periods
October 5, 2019

Have you noticed more faith stories in the Free Press over the past seven months? Have you wondered why?

It’s because of a Free Press project to increase the coverage of religion — with the support of the local faith community.

The project, which started in March, goes back to spring 2018. That’s when Free Press editor Paul Samyn indicated the paper was looking for new ways to engage and connect with people in Winnipeg.

When I suggested one group the paper could serve better was the faith community, he agreed. But where, he asked, would they find the money to pay for it?

Have you noticed more faith stories in the Free Press over the past seven months? Have you wondered why?

It’s because of a Free Press project to increase the coverage of religion — with the support of the local faith community.

The project, which started in March, goes back to spring 2018. That’s when Free Press editor Paul Samyn indicated the paper was looking for new ways to engage and connect with people in Winnipeg.

When I suggested one group the paper could serve better was the faith community, he agreed. But where, he asked, would they find the money to pay for it?

"What if I raise it?" I asked. Samyn and publisher Bob Cox said if money could be found, they would give it a try.

So starting in June last year, Cox and I made presentations to various faith groups, inviting them to provide financial support to increase reporting about religion in the Free Press.

The first group on board was Charleswood United Church. It was followed by the Jewish Federation and Jewish Foundation of Winnipeg; the Islamic Social Services Association; the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Winnipeg and the archbishop of St. Boniface, Albert LeGatt; Equipping the Saints, on behalf of evangelical churches in the city; Manitoba Multifaith Council; Anglican Diocese of Rupert’s Land; McClure United Church; the Presbytery of Winnipeg, Presbyterian Church in Canada; River East Church (Mennonite Brethren); Trinity United Church; and the Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of Winnipeg.

Altogether, they contributed over $32,000 to pay for additional freelance writing about faith in Winnipeg.

In offering this support, the faith groups understood they weren’t buying coverage for themselves; it was about boosting reporting about religion in general. They also understood unfavourable news about religion would continue to be reported.

The results? Since March, there have been 134 local religion stories in the Free Press. That’s an average of 19 a month, up from eight or nine a month previously.

And not only that: these articles can be found throughout the paper — front page, local section, arts, business and on the faith page. And since they are already paid for, they are free for anyone to read online.

For Samyn, the project is working for the newspaper.

"It is serving the faith community, showing people of faith that the Free Press recognizes them and the contribution they make to the community," he said. "This is important to the Free Press, since it wants to be known as a place where the whole community gathers."

It’s also good for news coverage, allowing the Free Press to do a better job of covering religion in depth — "not just when controversies arise," he said in an article in Broadview magazine (the former United Church Observer).

"Faith remains a strong influence in public life. To ignore its impact on our national discourse would be to shortchange our audience."

As for the support provided by the faith groups, "at a time when religion is all too often dismissed, discounted and derided, faith groups see value in the province’s largest media outlet telling their stories to a broader audience," he said.

Of course, there’s something else in it for the Free Press, too. This newspaper, like others across Canada, is challenged financially. It needs to find new ways to cover the cost of producing journalism. This arrangement with local faith groups is a new and creative way to do that.

It’s also unique in Canada, and possibly in the U.S., too. I’m not aware of any other daily newspaper or other media outlet receiving support from the faith community to report about religion.

In other words, what the faith community has here in Winnipeg is something special — something you won’t find anywhere else.

If you like it, let Samyn know; he’s always interested in what readers have to say. If your place of worship or faith group has news or stories of interest to the wider community, tell us; use the email address below.

And if your faith group or congregation isn’t among the sponsors, maybe you can encourage them to sign on.

faith@freepress.mb.ca

Project Will Add 143 New Beds To Rest Haven Facility
October 3, 2019

STEINBACH—Ground has been broken on a new 143-bed personal care home expansion in Steinbach that will ensure more seniors living in or near the community will have access to 24-hour supervision and nursing support when they need it, Health, Seniors and Active Living Minister Cameron Friesen announced here today.


“The expansion of the Rest Haven personal care home reflects our government’s commitment to providing seniors and all Manitobans with the consistent, reliable services they need, when and where they need them,” said Friesen, who participated in a sod-turning event at the construction site this morning.  “Adding personal care home spaces in Steinbach will provide senior citizens in this community with the appropriate, focused care they need.”

The new facility, expected to be complete by 2021, will include resident rooms with private washrooms and showers in clusters of 11 or 12.  Each cluster will have a large gathering space, a smaller private lounge area, a dining area and an activity space.  The new facility will also include maintenance, laundry and housekeeping service areas, storage, offices, staff areas and exterior patios, walkways and parking.

“Today marks the beginning of a reality envisioned by community partners over the decades, to carry forward the tradition of care excellence into newly constructed, resident-focused facilities for those requiring personal care services,” said David Driedger, chief executive officer, HavenGroup.  “HavenGroup is appreciative of the collaborative effort of all parties in aligning health system transformation with growing service needs in Steinbach and its surrounding area.”

The current Rest Haven personal care home in Steinbach has 60 beds and was built in 1984.  The new facility is being constructed next to the existing building and the 86-suite Woodhaven Manor elderly persons housing building.  The current personal care home will be renovated to provide support space.

“Families waiting on long-term care for their loved ones are in need of more personal care home spaces,” said Jane Curtis, chief executive officer, Southern Health-Santé Sud.  “People in Steinbach and its surrounding communities were eager to break ground on this much anticipated project at Rest Haven.  This new space will allow more people to stay closer to home for long-term personal care.  We look forward to joining our project partners and the Manitoba government in welcoming families and residents to this neighbourhood-minded community of holistic, long-term, personal care.”

Construction of the new facility supports the provincial government’s commitment to open 1,200 new personal care home beds by 2025, Friesen noted.

The Manitoba government will fund the majority of the project, with the support of HavenGroup, which is contributing $7 million.  Final project costs are subject to the tendering process.

IHCAM FALL NEWSLETTER
October 3, 2019

To view the Newsleter, click HERE

IHCAM releases Election Brochure promoting faith-based healthcare
July 30, 2019

Read all news